Skip to main content
Embrace the fog

Essential Photography Tips series – expanded distribution

If you have been following my blog, you already know I published two books under “Essential Photography Tips” series. Initially I choose to only publish them on Amazon platform, but now, due to demand from you, the readers, I am making the books available in other bookstores as well.

Essential Photography Tips
Essential Photography Tips: Get the Most out of Your DSLR

The first book of the series, “Essential Photography Tips: Get the Most out of Your DSLR”, is mainly intended for fresh DSLR owners who are looking to enhance their photographic skills and it is covering topics like: composition (“Rule of Thirds”, “Fill the Frame”, “Use a Simple Background”), how to (“How to Photograph Birds”, “How to Photograph a Scene Mainly Consisting or Black or White”), do’s and don’ts (“Do not Be Afraid to Go Out on a Cold Day”), tips on camera usage, general framework, post-production, and recommended accessories.

You can purchase “Essential Photography Tips: Get the Most out of Your DSLR” on any of the following links:

Essential Travel Photography Tips - Better Memories with Improved Photographic Skills
Essential Travel Photography Tips – Better Memories with Improved Photographic Skills

The series continues with “Essentials Travel Photography Tips – Better Memories with Improved Photographic Skills”, a book providing usable tips to any traveler wishing to improve his or her photographic skills. Reading the book you will find out how to plan your trip, where to find useful information, what equipment you shall carry, what to do in location, how to take care of your family, which schedule to have, how to deal with different shooting situations, how to better compose your pictures, how to make a backup plan, or how to stay out of trouble.

You can purchase “Essential Travel Photography Tips: Get the Most out of Your DSLR” on any of the following links:

Wherever you purchase any of my books, please do not forget to send me your feedback and leave a review on the book’s page from the chosen bookstore. Every review helps, even the short ones. This is very much appreciated. Enjoy your reading 🙂

How to photograph birds

How to photograph birds

Use camera in Shutter speed mode (usually S or Tv on your mode selection button). Use a shutter speed of no more than 1/250s (1/500s is even better).

Check the aperture proposed by camera. If it’s not a middle aperture (for example f/8), raise your ISO. A mid aperture will give you enough depth of field to get entire bird in focus.

Try to use a telephoto lens, it will be easier to fill the frame. If it’s not enough, you can crop in post-production to bring more focus to the subject.

Focus on the eye. After all, the image will be a bird portrait, and as you know the eyes are catching you 🙂

Use continuous focus.

Use single focus point, choose middle point for faster focus. If needed, crop your frame in post-production to meet rules of thirds for example.

Do not crop more than 25% in post-production, as this will lead to potentially unclear images.

Interested in more photography tips? Check my book, Essential Photography Tips: Get the Most out of Your DSLR.

How to shoot a landscape

How to shoot a landscape

– use camera in Aperture mode (usually A or Av on your mode selection button).

use a small aperture. Typically, in a landscape picture, you want everything to be in focus, from foreground to background. To get this, you will have to use a smaller aperture. F/8 is a good start for a landscape picture.

use a wide lens. To help with the effect we spoke above, you have to use a wide lens, and this will greatly help you to have a large depth of field. A wide lens will also help to capture the greatness of the nature. 17mm is a good start for landscape photography, but don’t be afraid to experiment.

– use a low ISO value to get a great image quality, even ISO 100 if possible

use a polarizing filter. A polarizing filter will greatly improve the quality of your landscape photos. The sky will be blue (instead of vague white grayish nuance), the vegetation will be more vivid (either green in the spring, either yellow/orange in the autumn)

– use a tripod. Small aperture combined with large distances, the usage of a polarizing filter and low ISO will result in low shutter speed, especially in low light situation. After the polarizing filter, the tripod is the most used accessory in the landscape photography world.

– use water as a mirror. If you photograph a lake, there will probably be reflections on the surface of the water. Make use of it, include both the reflected object and the reflection, or only part of the object and full reflection. Don’t be afraid to experiment 🙂

– include people. We are used to see people everywhere. Do not fear if there are people around your beautiful landscape. Embrace them, make humans an element of your photo.

– the sky is looking better with clouds. No doubt, a clear sky is boring. Throw some clouds in the sky and everything is changed 🙂 I’m not talking about post-processing. But you can be careful when framing. Nice interesting sky? Maybe make it bigger, usually two-thirds of the picture. Boring clear sky? Make it smaller, one-third of the picture, or even get the sky out of the frame.

– speaking of sky, in many landscape pictures we have to work with the horizon line. The big question is where we place it. Generally it’s a good idea to avoid the middle, remember the rule of thirds. For better results, you have to choose which element should have a bigger impact. If it’s the sky, then give the sky two-thirds of the image. If it’s the land, then give the land two-thirds of the image. You will get very different results in these two situations, maybe for start you want to try both ways.

shadows are really interesting in landscape photography. Avoid taking picture at noon, there is almost no shadow at all. Get out for landscape shooting in the mornings or in the evenings. You are going to see more details and a bigger sense of depth in your images.

Interested in more photography tips? Check my book, Essential Photography Tips: Get the Most out of Your DSLR.

%d bloggers like this: